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General Agreement On Trade In Services India

1. General obligations – they include all services and all members. It is necessary to request at the international level a comprehensive and independent assessment of the GATS and trade in services. Given the effective irreversibility of GATS-related market access and national treatment obligations, countries should not be put under pressure to liberalize their basic services. Developing countries, in particular, should avoid making liberalisation commitments for essential services under the GATS. The GATS reassessment should be part of a broader review of WTO agreements, a review requested by the government of developing countries and civil society organizations around the world. The expansion of trade in services has great prospects, although countries are generally reluctant to liberalize them. According to the WTO, “services currently account for more than 60% of world output and employment, but they account for no more than 20% of total trade (BOP base).” The potential for exchange of medical personnel between countries is confirmed by the experience of the whole world. Developing countries, particularly in Asia, provide more than half of the migrating physicians, with about 100,000 doctors of Indian origin, in the United States and the United Kingdom. Active international recruitment by national health care systems has contributed to a particularly high level of cross-border mobility among health care workers. Many countries that export doctors or nurses themselves suffer from severe shortages and can hardly afford to send their services abroad. Increased trade in health services risks reinforcing the transfer of medical personnel from poor to rich countries, which places an even greater burden on the health systems of the poorest countries. Since these are often the countries with the most acute health crises, the impact of increased trade on public health can be considerable.

Balancing these losses, the remittances that medical staff send home and the improvement of the skills they bring when and when they return are a bad compensation. The GATS defines the trade in services as the provision of a service through one of the four types of care: telemedicine is the most important example of the provision of cross-border services or the trade in health services: the provision of medical services by a doctor from one country to a patient or doctor in another country, notably via the internet or the satellite transmission of medical images. The potential benefits of telemedicine are still visible at an early stage, especially for diagnosis and remote treatment. Based on evidence of its use in remote rural communities in Japan and Australia, telemedicine could increase the capacity of physicians in developing countries. Under the GATS, procurement can benefit from four modes of transport: one of the cross-border services, for which the service is provided from one country to another (. B, for example, international phone calls, Internet services, telemedicine); second, consumption abroad, where individuals benefit from a service in another country (for example. B, tourists travelling abroad, patients who seek health care abroad); third, commercial presence when a foreign company establishes a subsidiary or branch in another country to provide local service (for example, banks. B, private health clinics); fourth, the presence of individuals: when people travel to another country to provide a temporary service (for example. B, software programmers, nurses, doctors). The GATS aims to establish a strong multilateral framework or principles and rules governing trade in services.

Many countries have laws that directly restrict access to foreign service companies in areas such as finance, media, communications, transport, etc.

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