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Oslo Accords Agreements

The agreements signed between Arafat and Rabin in 1993 and 1995 were controversial for many Israelis and Palestinians. Right-wing Israelis had opposed signing an agreement with the PLO, a group they considered a terrorist organization – although Arafat renounced violence. Israeli settlers feared that Rabin`s so-called “land for peace” formula would lead to their expulsion from the country they consider their biblical right, despite the UN`s position that Israeli settlements were built in violation of international law. In a 2001 video, Mr. Netanyahu, who did not know it had been recorded, said: “Before the elections, they asked me if I was going to honor [the Oslo Accords]… I said I would, but [that] I will interpret the chords in such a way that I will gallop to the 67 limits. How did we do that? No one said what the military zones were. Defined military zones are safe zones; For me, the whole Jordan Valley is a defined military zone. Go ahead and argue. [10] [11] Mr. Netanyahu went on to explain how he conditioned his signing of the 1997 Hebron Agreement to U.S. approval, that there were no inferences from “certain military locations” and insisted that he be able to indicate which areas constitute a “military site” – like the entire Jordan Valley. “Why is it important? Because from that moment on, I stopped the Oslo Accords,” Netanyahu said. [12] However, this is clearly in line with Yitzhak Rabin`s October 1995 statement to the Knesset regarding the ratification of the Oslo Interim Agreement: “B.

The security border of the State of Israel will be in the Jordan Valley, in the broadest sense of the word. [13] [14] For the most part, the agreements demanded the withdrawal of Israeli forces from parts of the Gaza Strip and the West Bank and reaffirmed a Palestinian right of autonomy in those territories through the creation of a Palestinian interim self-government authority. Palestinian rule is expected to last for a five-year transition period, during which “permanent status negotiations” would begin in order to reach a final agreement. (4) Both parties agree that the outcome of the sustainable status negotiations should not be compromised or anticipated by the agreements reached during the transition period. [1] The Oslo process is the “peace process” that began in 1993 with secret talks between Israel and the PLO. There was a round of negotiations, suspension, mediation, resumption of negotiations and again suspension. A number of agreements were reached until the end of the Oslo process, following the failure of the Camp David Summit in 2000 and the outbreak of the second Intifada. [5] [6] The agreements have been hotly debated in Israel; The left wing supported it, while the right wing rejected it.

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